About the Section for Computational and RNA Biology – Biologisk Institut - Københavns Universitet

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Section for Computational and RNA Biology > About the Section

The Section for computational and RNA Biology

We conduct basic research in bioinformatics using different models - probabilistic models and comparative methods for computational analysis of non-coding RNA, we also research in gene regulation and protein structure.

Wide spec of experimental biology

Molecular Biology is also conducted as basic research; molecular biology is looking at gene transcription and associated regulatory mechanisms. Consequently we span a wide spectrum of experimental biology and bioinformatics methods, as well as computational bioinformatics methods.

History behind the origin of the section

The Section for Computational and RNA Biology of Bioinformatics has since 2006 been a part of the Department of Biology (formerly Department of Molecular Biology) in which it constitutes one of the largest sections. The section is also closely affiliated with BRIC, which co-hosts a significant part of the section staff consisting of around 70 employees amongst them Professors, PhD students, Postdoc’s, Technical and Administrative staff.

Bioinformatics Centre in connection with the section

Under the Faculty of Science The Bioinformatics Centre' was founded in 2002 as an independent Centre. At the time the Centre kick-started bioinformatics research and -education at the University of Copenhagen.  

 Masters student program and the Bioinformatics Centre
Our Master’s program now accepts approximately around 35 students every year,  roughly half of the accepted Master students are Danish. All courses are taught in English as we welcome international students. The two-year master's program started in September 2002, and the number of applicants grows annually.

Research collaborations in the industry and academia
The Bioinformatics Centre has subgroups working in non-coding RNA, gene regulation and protein structure prediction. We specialise in probabilistic models and machine learning. We collaborate with many experimental groups in the Department, at BRIC and at other institutions around the world as well as the industry, in particular the medical industry, Christian Hansen, Novo Nordisk and the international consortium Elixir.