Research


Martin Werner Berchtold / Calcium Signaling Lab

We are interested in studying calcium-dependent signaling systems regulating cell proliferation, programmed cell death, intracellular trafficking, cancer cell membrane repair and heart muscle function. We focus on the calcium binding proteins calmodulin and ALG-2, playing central roles in a plethora of crucial signaling processes. The recent discovery of calmodulin mutations causing heart arrhythmia led us to study molecular mechanisms possibly disturbed by these mutations with the aim to discover new avenues for diagnostics and treatment of deadly heart diseases.


Søren Tvorup Christensen / The Cilia Group

We study the molecular mechanisms by which primary cilia assemble, disassemble, and function to coordinate cellular signalling networks during development and tissue homeostasis. Currently our work is focused on how the balanced activation of ciliary signalling is regulated by microtubule-dependent vesicular trafficking to and from cilia, and how defects in these processes are linked to cancer and developmental disorders, including congenital heart and brain diseases.


Jacob B. Hansen / Metabolic Regulation Lab

We study the molecular control of differentiation, activation and metabolism of brown adipocytes. Our interest in brown adipose tissue biology derives from the striking ability of brown adipocytes to counteract obesity and insulin resistance in experimental animals and the observation that active brown fat is present in many adult humans. Ongoing projects revolve around metabolic regulation and signal transduction. Our aim is to uncover novel regulatory mechanisms through which brown adipose tissue can be exploited therapeutically.


Karsten Kristiansen / Laboratory of Genomics and Molecular Biomedicine

We use a combination of large scale genomics/metagenomics and bioinformatics analyses with state of the art molecular biology, animal models and human studies to unravel how the complex interplay between nutrients, the host genome, the gut microbiome and the immune system influences human health and diseases. The projects are performed in close collaboration with several national as well as international research groups in Europe, USA and China.


Ian Henry Lambert / The Taurine Group

Taurine (β-amino ethane sulphonic acid), which accounts for approximately 0.1% of our total body weight, is in our lab used as a model to illustrate how cells modulate the cellular content of organic osmolytes following cellular stress (osmotic challenge, exposure to chemotherapeutic drugs, hypoxia, ischemia) and to characterize essential physiological processes (metabolic flexibility, oxidative capacity, cell death) that are affected by shift in the cellular taurine content.


Nadja Møbjerg / Møbjerg Lab

Our research activities are within comparative and integrative zoology with current focus on the microscopic tardigrades and cryptobiosis, a state of latent life, where metabolism has come to a reversible standstill. Our research covers investigations into molecular, physiological and anatomical adaptations to extreme environments including studies on the evolution of taxa, organs and molecules. The overall aim is to provide new insight into the underlying mechanisms and evolution of extreme adaptations, such as cryptobiosis.


Ivana Novak / Signaling and Transport in Epithelia

We study the role of purinergic signaling in regulation of ion transport and other cellular processes in pancreas, an organ with vital roles in digestion and whole body metabolism. Our projects focus on ATP release mechanisms, selected purinergic receptors,  ion channels and transporters in exocrine, endocrine and stromal cells. Our aim is to elucidate their roles in pancreatic physiology and pathophysiology, including pancreatic cancer and diabetes. Long-term goal is to exploit purinergic signaling research to provide new therapeutic approaches for pancreatic diseases.


Lotte Bang Pedersen / The Cilia Group

We study the molecular mechanisms by which primary cilia assemble, disassemble, and function to coordinate cellular signalling networks during development and tissue homeostasis. Currently our work is focused on how the balanced activation of ciliary signalling is regulated by microtubule-dependent vesicular trafficking to and from cilia, and how defects in these processes are linked to cancer and developmental disorders, including congenital heart and brain diseases.


Per Amstrup Pedersen / Membrane Proteins Group

The focus of our research is membrane proteins in science, medicine and biotechnology. Membrane proteins constitute around 1/3 of all proteins in any kind of cell and are responsible for the controlled transport of matter and information across membranes. Knowledge the structure and function of membrane proteins is therefore fundamental for understanding life. In addition membrane proteins constitute the target for the great majority of presently known drugs and are the most prominent lead in the discovery of new drugs. In addition to this the efficient transport capacity and high degree of specificity of membrane transporters poses a lot of unrealized potential for industrial separation and sensing processes.


Stine Falsig Pedersen / The NHE1 Lab

The overall goal of our research is to understand the structure-function dynamics and physiology/pathophysiology of mammalian pH-regulatory ion transporters, with emphasis on their roles in epithelial cancers. To reach this goal, we focus on a few selected transporters, in particular, the Na+/H+ exchanger NHE1 and the Na+,HCO3- cotransporter NBCn1. We collaborate extensively, allowing us to study these transporters from the gene- and single molecule structure and dynamics level over their cell biology, in complex 3D culture models, and eventually to animal models. Whenever possible, we iterate between transporter structure-function dynamics and cell biological, physiological, and pathophysiological/clinical data to obtain an integrated understanding of transporter regulation and roles.


Henriette Pilegaard / HP Lab

Our research aims at understanding the molecular mechanisms behind the beneficial effects of physical activity in preventing lifestyle related metabolic diseases. This involves metabolic regulation in skeletal muscle, white adipose tissue and the liver. Our focus is the impact of 1) the transcriptional coactivator PGC-1α in exercise training-induced adaptations and mitochondrial function in aging and during high fat diet 2) the myokine interleukin-6 in substrate recruitment during metabolic challenges and 3) of pyruvate dehydrogenase in metabolic flexibility.


Lone Rønnov-Jessen / Epithelial-Stromal Interaction Lab

With the aim of understanding development, homeostasis and carcinogenesis in human breast, we study cells from normal and cancerous breast with emphasis on cellular and molecular mechanisms in epithelial-stromal interaction. Ongoing projects focus on regulation and function of stem cells, female sex hormone receptors, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and epithelial morphogenesis.


Berthe Marie Willumsen / BMW lab

During development, genes are turned on or off when specifying specific tissues. Modifications of histones maintain these expression patterns, one of which is the trimethylation of lysine 27 of histone H3. This mark is set by the Polycomb Repressive Complex 2, which is active also in embryonic stem cells. With the aim of understanding the mechanism of selection of the target genes, I work with J. Højfeldt in the group of K. Helin in analyzing the effects of removal of the catalytic activity of PRC2 - on chromatin localization, gene expression, growth and differentiation.