Identifying the core microbial community in the gut of fungus-growing termites

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

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Identifying the core microbial community in the gut of fungus-growing termites. / Otani, Saria; Mikaelyan, Aram; Nobre, Tânia; Hansen, Lars H.; Koné, N'Golo A.; Sørensen, Søren Johannes; Aanen, Duur K.; Boomsma, Jacobus Jan; Brune, Andreas; Thomas-Poulsen, Michael.

In: Molecular Ecology, Vol. 23, No. 18, 2014, p. 4631–4644.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlepeer-review

Harvard

Otani, S, Mikaelyan, A, Nobre, T, Hansen, LH, Koné, NGA, Sørensen, SJ, Aanen, DK, Boomsma, JJ, Brune, A & Thomas-Poulsen, M 2014, 'Identifying the core microbial community in the gut of fungus-growing termites', Molecular Ecology, vol. 23, no. 18, pp. 4631–4644. https://doi.org/10.1111/mec.12874

APA

Otani, S., Mikaelyan, A., Nobre, T., Hansen, L. H., Koné, NG. A., Sørensen, S. J., Aanen, D. K., Boomsma, J. J., Brune, A., & Thomas-Poulsen, M. (2014). Identifying the core microbial community in the gut of fungus-growing termites. Molecular Ecology, 23(18), 4631–4644. https://doi.org/10.1111/mec.12874

Vancouver

Otani S, Mikaelyan A, Nobre T, Hansen LH, Koné NGA, Sørensen SJ et al. Identifying the core microbial community in the gut of fungus-growing termites. Molecular Ecology. 2014;23(18):4631–4644. https://doi.org/10.1111/mec.12874

Author

Otani, Saria ; Mikaelyan, Aram ; Nobre, Tânia ; Hansen, Lars H. ; Koné, N'Golo A. ; Sørensen, Søren Johannes ; Aanen, Duur K. ; Boomsma, Jacobus Jan ; Brune, Andreas ; Thomas-Poulsen, Michael. / Identifying the core microbial community in the gut of fungus-growing termites. In: Molecular Ecology. 2014 ; Vol. 23, No. 18. pp. 4631–4644.

Bibtex

@article{6265d10984c048b7857e54d6facfd966,
title = "Identifying the core microbial community in the gut of fungus-growing termites",
abstract = "Gut microbes play a crucial role in decomposing lignocellulose to fuel termite societies, with protists in the lower termites and prokaryotes in the higher termites providing these services. However, a single basal subfamily of the higher termites, the Macrotermitinae, also domesticated a plant biomass-degrading fungus (Termitomyces), and how this symbiont acquisition has affected the fungus-growing termite gut microbiota has remained unclear. The objective of our study was to compare the intestinal bacterial communities of five genera (nine species) of fungus-growing termites to establish whether or not an ancestral core microbiota has been maintained and characterizes extant lineages. Using 454-pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, we show that gut communities have representatives of 26 bacterial phyla and are dominated by Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Spirochaetes, Proteobacteria, and Synergistetes. A set of 42 genus-level taxa was present in all termite species and accounted for 56-68% of the species-specific reads. Gut communities of termites from the same genus were more similar than distantly related species, suggesting that phylogenetic ancestry matters, possibly in connection with specific termite genus-level ecological niches. Finally, we show that gut communities of fungus-growing termites are similar to cockroaches, both at the bacterial phylum level and in a comparison of the core Macrotermitinae taxa abundances with representative cockroach, lower termite, and higher non-fungus-growing termites. These results suggest that the obligate association with Termitomyces has forced the bacterial gut communities of the fungus-growing termites towards a relatively uniform composition with higher similarity to their omnivorous relatives than to more closely related termites. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.",
author = "Saria Otani and Aram Mikaelyan and T{\^a}nia Nobre and Hansen, {Lars H.} and Kon{\'e}, {N'Golo A.} and S{\o}rensen, {S{\o}ren Johannes} and Aanen, {Duur K.} and Boomsma, {Jacobus Jan} and Andreas Brune and Michael Thomas-Poulsen",
note = "This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.1111/mec.12874",
language = "English",
volume = "23",
pages = "4631–4644",
journal = "Molecular Ecology",
issn = "0962-1083",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "18",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Identifying the core microbial community in the gut of fungus-growing termites

AU - Otani, Saria

AU - Mikaelyan, Aram

AU - Nobre, Tânia

AU - Hansen, Lars H.

AU - Koné, N'Golo A.

AU - Sørensen, Søren Johannes

AU - Aanen, Duur K.

AU - Boomsma, Jacobus Jan

AU - Brune, Andreas

AU - Thomas-Poulsen, Michael

N1 - This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - Gut microbes play a crucial role in decomposing lignocellulose to fuel termite societies, with protists in the lower termites and prokaryotes in the higher termites providing these services. However, a single basal subfamily of the higher termites, the Macrotermitinae, also domesticated a plant biomass-degrading fungus (Termitomyces), and how this symbiont acquisition has affected the fungus-growing termite gut microbiota has remained unclear. The objective of our study was to compare the intestinal bacterial communities of five genera (nine species) of fungus-growing termites to establish whether or not an ancestral core microbiota has been maintained and characterizes extant lineages. Using 454-pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, we show that gut communities have representatives of 26 bacterial phyla and are dominated by Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Spirochaetes, Proteobacteria, and Synergistetes. A set of 42 genus-level taxa was present in all termite species and accounted for 56-68% of the species-specific reads. Gut communities of termites from the same genus were more similar than distantly related species, suggesting that phylogenetic ancestry matters, possibly in connection with specific termite genus-level ecological niches. Finally, we show that gut communities of fungus-growing termites are similar to cockroaches, both at the bacterial phylum level and in a comparison of the core Macrotermitinae taxa abundances with representative cockroach, lower termite, and higher non-fungus-growing termites. These results suggest that the obligate association with Termitomyces has forced the bacterial gut communities of the fungus-growing termites towards a relatively uniform composition with higher similarity to their omnivorous relatives than to more closely related termites. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

AB - Gut microbes play a crucial role in decomposing lignocellulose to fuel termite societies, with protists in the lower termites and prokaryotes in the higher termites providing these services. However, a single basal subfamily of the higher termites, the Macrotermitinae, also domesticated a plant biomass-degrading fungus (Termitomyces), and how this symbiont acquisition has affected the fungus-growing termite gut microbiota has remained unclear. The objective of our study was to compare the intestinal bacterial communities of five genera (nine species) of fungus-growing termites to establish whether or not an ancestral core microbiota has been maintained and characterizes extant lineages. Using 454-pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, we show that gut communities have representatives of 26 bacterial phyla and are dominated by Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Spirochaetes, Proteobacteria, and Synergistetes. A set of 42 genus-level taxa was present in all termite species and accounted for 56-68% of the species-specific reads. Gut communities of termites from the same genus were more similar than distantly related species, suggesting that phylogenetic ancestry matters, possibly in connection with specific termite genus-level ecological niches. Finally, we show that gut communities of fungus-growing termites are similar to cockroaches, both at the bacterial phylum level and in a comparison of the core Macrotermitinae taxa abundances with representative cockroach, lower termite, and higher non-fungus-growing termites. These results suggest that the obligate association with Termitomyces has forced the bacterial gut communities of the fungus-growing termites towards a relatively uniform composition with higher similarity to their omnivorous relatives than to more closely related termites. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

U2 - 10.1111/mec.12874

DO - 10.1111/mec.12874

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 25066007

VL - 23

SP - 4631

EP - 4644

JO - Molecular Ecology

JF - Molecular Ecology

SN - 0962-1083

IS - 18

ER -

ID: 122376155